Spotlight on Research

How 42% of us have abandoned the alarm clock during lockdown

New research shows that the pandemic has had some major impacts on our sleep patterns. By Sudha Raman and Prof Andrew Coogan, Department of Psychology

Monday, 08 March 2021

How visual art gives us rich insights into how our brains work

Just like listening to music, viewing works of art can have a profound effect on our mental health, writes Dr Richard Roche, Department of Psychology

Wednesday, 03 March 2021

How to make homeschooling work for parents

The best way to manage homeschooling is to prioritise family care over the curriculum, writes Dr Katriona O’Sullivan, Department of Psychology

Tuesday, 23 February 2021

Why the dryrobe wars shouldn't put you off outdoor swimming

Irish swimming places have always welcomed people regardless of body shape, size, skin or what you're wearing, writes Dr Ronan Foley, Department of Geography

Tuesday, 16 February 2021

Why do so many people believe Covid-19 conspiracy theories?

Conspiracy theories have been widespread during this pandemic and pose a significant risk to health, writes Dr Joanne McVeigh and Prof Malcolm MacLachlan, of the ALL Institute

Tuesday, 09 February 2021

How a grisly atrocity influenced a 17th century Irish ghost story

A ghost story based on the 1641 Irish Rebellion became a cautionary tale warning Protestants of Catholic savagery and treachery, writes Dr Eamon Darcy, a historian of Early-Modern Ireland and Britain

Tuesday, 02 February 2021

SAR - Sptlight - generic glasses at PC

Researchers at Risk supported into skilled posts in industry

Researchers fleeing persecution are being supported into skilled posts in industry, writes Peter McGuire

Monday, 25 January 2021

Enhancing our wellbeing during the lockdown

Taking steps from the anagram THRIVE can help us cope more effectively with difficult situations such as the lockdown, explains Dr Jolanta Burke, Department of Education

Monday, 18 January 2021

'British army recruiting party entices civilians to enlist', by R. and D. Havell after George Walker, published in 1814. Image courtesy of Wikimedia.

What has the British army ever done for us?

Money, education and opportunities explain why 150,000 Irish people served in the British army between 1793 and 1815, writes Jim Deery, PhD scholar, Department of History

Monday, 11 January 2021

Violence, protest and melees: hurling in pre-famine Ireland

A sport once promoted by the gentry, 19th century hurling matches were action-packed on and off the pitch writes Dr Ciarán Reilly, a historian of 19th & 20th century Irish history at Maynooth University

Monday, 04 January 2021

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